Tag: dogs

It’s Not the Destination, It’s the Journey- An Imaginary Parents Evening.

Today I managed to go on some unescorted leave. It was sunny and subsaharan on the unit because the heating seems to be permanently on full. To say I was desperate to get out is an understatement and in my rush of excitement to go outside I forgot that I don’t know the local area at all. So armed with a very tiny map that I didn’t want to admit I couldn’t read; off I went. A member of staff had marked onto the map in red felt tip a short and simple route to the church and back.

It turns out that there are two churches in the vicinity of the hospital-and of course I initially went to the wrong one which was in completely the wrong direction. I asked for directions from an elderly lady who, after telling me how brave I am for:
a) being blind
b) existing
told me to follow the road until I came across a ‘horsey smell’. Sadly she declined my request for conventional directions. So myself and Noodle stumbled around trying to follow our noses to a smell that never came.

It took about an hour for me to find myself stuck in the graveyard of the church I had initially been looking for. Unable to find my way out of said graveyard and no one live to ask for directions I stumbled into what I thought was a big green field. There appeared to be dogs running around so I let Noodle go for a frolic while I tried to work out where we were and how we could get back.

Splash. A shallow river made itself known and Noodle in all her wisdom decided to swim alongside me as I paced the bank. Still lost I asked a woman for directions to ‘the school’ -which would then point me in the right direction for the unit. She decided to walk me there instead.

“Is there anything on at the school?” She asked as we walked.
“Yeah…” I say accidentally, having just realised that we are at the wrong school and that I’m completely lost. Why did this village insist on having two of everything?
“What’s on?” She asked.
“Parents evening.” I responded. I really don’t know why but that was the first thought in my head. I knew instantly how stupid this sounded but felt too paralysed with awkwardness to do anything. I felt like I had dived into a shark tank of social tension.
“On a bank holiday?” She asked with a slight tone of disbelief, clearly thinking that I am deranged or mourning some imaginary child who attended this school.
I mumbled something along the lines of “yes isn’t it ridiculous” as I kicked myself silently for putting myself in this mess. She eventually left me at the derelict school.

I must have walked miles around the village today because I have never been so completely lost in my life. But I couldn’t have been happier.

My life is bonkers sometimes but I do completely love it. There are many things worse than being lost on a sunny day with my furry colleague. Even if she does decide to go for a dive. I really do need to work on the awkwardness thing though…

I suppose I could use a cheesy recovery quote at this point: “It’s not the destination it’s the journey” etcetera etcetera. But don’t worry. I won’t.

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Angels Can Have Four Paws

I thought I would share this post with UpsideDownChronicles readers as well as people who know me from elsewhere. It’s the next day and I have slept the majority of the day and have lots of aches and pains. Nothing more than what could be expected though. Noodle has waited for me to play all day. She gives me hugs and licks my feet as I sleep; she is never impatient with me. We had a play at lunchtime and she got a good groom and a game of fetch. Now she is sleeping next to me as we watch Mean Girls for what must be the 6th time this week… Night! 

Today I am grateful for my furry colleague and partner in crime. How can this paw perfect little guide dog switch roles so fast? In church she was a guiding dream- she even got blessed. But this evening I had two major dissociation episodes and she turned into my own furry superhero! There was a short time when I came round and it looked like the worst of it was over, so the staff propped the door open with a chair and went to get me a drink. The gremlin gripped me again while they were gone and the last thing I remember was the sound of her scrabbling to get out, under the chair, to find help. If I was fine she would never dream of doing this, It’s against all her training but she knows she must do it if I am going to get help. She went straight to staff and brought them to me. Things could have got so much worse if she hadn’t.

The staff tried to make her calm down but she wouldn’t stop licking and licking me, putting her paws on me. She wanted me back! A member of staff took her out but still she wouldn’t calm. Had I been able I would have told staff that this was pointless- she only calms when she knows I’m supported and safe. Then it died and I was finally okay and she sunk straight back into being a beautifully behaved guide dog. No more craziness from either of us.

Now I’m as tired as if I ran a marathon- but if I stand up she will stand with me. I will slip a finger inside her collar and she will help me. One step at a time. I can’t express how thankful I am to have her in my life right now. I couldn’t do it without her and I certainly don’t say it enough. The nurses are now calling her ‘the super dog’. Anyway this has taken like an hour and a half to type but I just wanted to say thank you to anyone who supports guide dogs in any way. Every single guide dog is a super hero, they are our eyes and so much more. It’s incredible. I am also just so thankful that my little guide dog decided ophthalmology wasn’t enough, and took on the neurological too. Guide Dog of the Year Beyond the Call of Duty? I think it was very much deserved. Who knew angels could have four paws ey?

noodle and human snuggling
Old photo- “If I lay here, if i just lay here, would you lie with me and just forget the world”

How to Smuggle a Dog into a Hospital

A Dog in A Hospital?

“No.” She said. “Definitely no.” The rather pinkish woman, introduced to me as the ward manager of the PMU, was looking down at a rather sheepish looking Noodle and I. Myself, in a hospital gown and a tired Labrador curled at the end of my bed. It is the 14th of August and soon to be my second night on paediatrics. The previous night Noodle had returned to a friend’s house to be fed but from the second she arrived back on the ward she made it quite clear she had no intention of moving again without me. The little dog had spent the day watching members of the psychiatric team coming in and out- sending the message ‘don’t hurt her’ telepathically through her chocolate eyes. Now she was tired and warm and just wanted to sleep the night away by my side.

“We can’t.” The woman reconfirmed.

“You can.” I say, my voice wavered as I begged my eyes not to fill. “She’s a guide dog, I need her to move around. She’s my eyes.” I don’t want to have to have this conversation- I am after all here because I can’t deal with the normal stuff, let alone advocate myself.

“The other children don’t have dogs in.” She continues. “Their dogs are special too” I grimace at the word ‘special’. Then to my great relief a mental health worker returns and after a ‘quiet word’ the pinkish lady’s orders had lifted, though her scepticism hadn’t.

Noodle spent the night alternating between my bed and the chair beside my bed. The floor was freezing cold and I had nothing to offer her in the way of a blanket. She then went on to spend every night with me in the PMU, a favourite with the nurses and a source of curiosity for passers-by. In fact her stay had gone embarrassingly well for the reluctant pink lady. After a couple of nights I find myself sitting with the duty psychiatrist, who kindly popped in everyday regardless of when her shift ended, at the end of my bed. We were discussing my fears of Noodle being rejected again. I knew I was going to go to hospital but I had no idea where, finding a CAMHS bed is like a cut-throat level of bidding on Ebay. Beds were hard to find for anyone, let alone a girl with a dog.

“She has to come with me.” I tell the psychiatrist as I stroke Noodle’s ears.

“I know…” she replied, biting her lip as she watched us carefully. “I have put in all the referrals that the dog is non-negotiable. Both of you or neither.”  She smiled and I smiled back, though her voice was that of someone who was attempting to build a hadron-collider in their basement.

News came back on Friday that there was a possibility I would be going to the *Heron unit. They had to check that there was no one on the ward with an allergy or a dog phobia and everyone’s parents had to be called. I later found out that in the gap between that Friday and my arrival on the Tuesday there had been several calls to guide dogs. Most of the queries were on the ‘will it poo everywhere?’ variety. Within a week of arriving on the ward Noodle was the favourite of all the patients. Her determination to keep me safe never wavered, running to get staff when I needed help and sitting in the corridor outside my room to show if I was about to do something dangerous. She even tried her hand at carrying cards with messages on to the staff!

Now, as I am about to be transferred, the ward is having trouble contemplating what they are going to do without a dog on the ward. A far cry from the ‘infection control risk’ they reluctantly took in. I hope that they find themselves a PAT –Pets as Therapy- dog. Though I think that the ward manager is quite keen on getting her own dog and bringing it to work with her every day! Overall, this dog belongs with me. No matter what.

Nope and Noodle