Bollocks to BPD

Diagnosis ain’t easy.

I first heard of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) at Heron. The psychiatrist there seemed to be trying to fill a ward quota of 25% of female patients being diagnosed with BPD. I wasn’t in that percent.

The next time I heard it I was sitting in my CPA meeting for professionals. My new psychiatrist reeled off my conditions and then the letters- B.P.D. After the meeting was over and myself and my key nurse were on our victory lap around the village I asked if she’d heard it too. She wasn’t sure.

I asked for confirmation when I saw the doctor next. He quickly drew a grid with numbers and the disorders I have come to know. Then there it was- BPD. He said something about how this is what he suspects my problem lies within- my Jabberwocky to fight.

“Personality disorders have a stigma to them.” He added. “But don’t worry, it’s not the one serial killers have.”

Looking it up on the Internet isn’t pleasant. People with BPD were clingy and unstable. All the stories I could find were negative. ‘WHERE ARE THE REAL PEOPLE?!’ I found myself mentally screaming. And I’m ashamed to say I didn’t want to make myself one of the few who spoke up. The stigma seemed huge. But if no one speaks up, who else will be scared into silence by this monster? I tentatively took my first move with my poem borderline and now this.

To make matters worse in my quest for information, symptoms listed on every website I searched seemed increasingly vague or scary. Out of desperation I hit the books and surfaced with “Sometimes I Act Crazy“. Which gave me the broadest picture of the disorder and those living with it. I would highly recommend it for anyone else scared away by the Internet.

I think the description of BPD on rethink is the best:

  • “Borderline personality disorder (BPD) can mean that you are prone to strong emotions, mood swings and feelings you can’t cope with easily and may feel distressed a lot of the time.
  • Around 1 in 100 people have BPD.
  • There may be different reasons why someone develops BPD.
  • There are a number of different approaches to treating BPD, most of which include different types of one-to-one and group talking therapies.
  • Complications can arise if you have BPD, including problems with substance misuse and self-harm.”

It’s still vague; but every warrior is different. The thing with mental illness diagnosis is that it says more about your past than your future. My brain developed a little different. I see and hear things you can’t. My moods swing in ways you can’t predict. But whatever it says about me now, or me then, I am going to have CONQUERED my Jabberwocky soon. Just you wait. It doesn’t matter what it’s name is. If it is one disorder or three. It’s going down.

And then I will stand in the street; in the rain, in bare feet and scream at the top of my lungs: 

“I made it!!”

And I don’t care who hears me. 

 

Because I’m getting out alive.  

5 thoughts on “Bollocks to BPD

  1. BPD is such a scary diagnoses. If you google it, like you said, were clingy, manipulative, liar’s, violent, abusive, and that dreaded word comes up over and over again CRAZY.CRAZY.CRAZY. And by the time I finally got diagnosed, I was all of those things, because I’d been left undiagnosed for so long because psychologists are often unwilling to diagnose BPD. I was 18 1/2 at diagnosis, I’m now 21, an age I never thought I’d see. Iv been mentally I’ll since the age of 7 at least (too young for a phycologists to even consider a diagnosis of ANYTHING in the UK) but now I’m stable. I haven’t harmed my self or others in over a year. My emotions are still stronger and harder to control than a ‘standard’ person, but thanks to DBT I have the skills to deal with that. I still disassociate sometimes, but no where near as much, and I never black out and get psychotic any more. I’m as well as I’m ever going to be, and life is good, and I’m grateful. So what if i take strong anti psychotics and anti depressants every day, if that’s what iv got to do to be happy and stable, I don’t care, because my life and my mind is the best it ever has been.

    Sorry for rambling, it just means a lot to me to see someone else with BPD standing up!

    In October, I start Open University doing my BSc Hons in Psychology so I can become a clinical psychologist, and help to fix what I see as serious faults in NHS treatment of people who have been through serious trauma and abuse, which is a leading cause of BPD 😀

    • Oh thank you so much for sharing. I can’t sit down. If no one is doing the awareness raising and stigma fighting then I will certainly give it a bash. For you, for me and anyone who has to deal with this horrible illness. You have come so far and you are a beacon of hope. Stay strong. Xx

      • And if I can do anything to help you raise awareness and end the stigma, just ask and I will 🙂 xx

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