Inspector ‘Poireau’ Saves the Day…

Day Four in Lyon:

Straight after breakfast we went into an English language lesson inside the secondary school. These were older children doing an English listening activity. I found it hard not to laugh because the audio was something which you could imagine being on Radio 4. All the characters had impeccable English accents and had stereotypically British names like ‘Poppy’ and ‘Luke’. It surprised me that some of the words in the activity were unusualy complex- such as lawnmower. It reminded me of studying French before my GCSE and learning unusual words in the lessons that I could never imagine being useful. But who knows, perhaps one of the French pupils will become a horticulturalist and move to the UK.

A classroom poster explaining english negatives

Next we had a session booked to practice our speaking exams. The English students had topics to try out on us and we had ones for them. I was in this session with my friend C who is studying A2 French. We both found the session very difficult because we weren’t clear on what the French students were saying to us. Worry quickly set in as we realised that we would be doing this exam in a weeks time and we were nowhere near ready. Though the students were lovely I felt rather put back on the confidence scale because they didn’t seem to understand what I was saying and I didn’t understand them either. Myself and C did however help them on their topic of Margaret Thatcher because we both have very opposing views.

My language flunk continued into the next session which was ‘Torball’- the French equivalent of goalball for VI people. I was really wanting to get the flow back that I had the day before but every time I tried to speak French to someone they told me they could speak English. I had a go at the sport and I was lucky because no balls came my way. England won 3 – 0, literally beating them at their own game.

J, K and P playing Torball

I don’t think I have ever said the phrase “I was saved by a leek” before. But today it certainly applied. We were doing a sensory activity with the pupils studying gardening and landscaping. This involved wearing a blindfold and trying to identify different smells, tastes, textures and sounds. I was shown around the activity by a lady who didn’t speak much English, she was very friendly though and laughed at my extreme facial expressions when sniffing the strong smells and touching the odd textures. I was doing my best to tell her what I thought the items were in French but my language ability seemed to be really fluctuating. That is when I was handed a leek. I was surprised because there is nowhere in the Edexcel syllabus which describes it as necessary vocabulary for the AS course- yet I knew it. ‘Poireau’ instantly came up in my mind, accompanied by an image of a leek as an inspector. When I gave my answer of ‘Poireau’ to the lady and she said it was correct it felt like my fears had been lifted. If I know the word for something as bizarre and specific as leek I can’t be that bad at French right?

A hand drawn cartoon of a leek dressed as inspector Poirot

After lunch we went to the Lyon football stadium. It is a huge arena which used to be a velodrome, but a replacement stadium is now in the process of being built because the current one is too small. We saw the VIP boxes and the changing rooms- we even chilled out in the team’s pitch-side chairs! The tour didn’t last long so we went on to do some shopping in a huge mall which appeared to be neither inside nor outside. We only had a short amount of time before we had to go to our meal reservation so we all had to prioritise which shops we wanted to go to. Myself and French teacher C were the only ones who had book shops at the top of our list so we went together to ‘Decitre’ which is a very large book store. There were so many books to admire and I loved finding the French translations of books that are currently popular in the UK. C got herself a very nice copy of Les Misérables which I loved because it was so chunky, and I couldn’t help but get a copy of Wonder by R.J Palacio (a book which isn’t hard to fall in love with). I also got an audiobook called ‘La Mécanique du cŒur’ which nearly every worker in the shop told me is an amazing story.

The group sitting in the team seats

As it was the last night we all went for a meal out in a huge restaurant. It was very grand and had mirrors on the walls making it look even bigger than it already was. French teacher C (after a glass of wine) decided that she would tell us some swear words in French so that we could ‘avoid situations’. Much laughter ensued. A few of us tried snails and most who did liked them, though I couldn’t bring myself to do it.

After coming out of the metero we got a tiny bit lost. We couldn’t work out which way we were supposed to go to get back to CSRP and it was another late night. R ended up running up and down the road (which was quite funny considering he had already had a rather strong rum cake by this point) in order to try and find our turning. We ended up reading one of the large maps which seem to be scattered everywhere in Lyon and eventually we crept back into the internat where we were staying. All the pupils here go to bed with lights out at 10:30pm sharp. I can’t imagine that working at our college for some reason…!

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