The Language Nerd is Unleashed

Day two in Lyon:
After a night sleeping on slightly bizarre cylindrical french pillows we were very excited to encounter our first French breakfast. Breakfast appears to be a big deal here, with tables littered with platters and jugs of hot drinks. As an ad-hoc breakfaster myself I was initially wary, but I can never refuse a hot chocolate. A few people in our group were fascinated by the concept of brioche: “So it is like a cake without fruit or chocolate or anything?” They asked before grabbing another slice.

After eating far too much we headed over to the CDI. It stands for: ‘Centre d’Information et Documentation’ and is the equivalent of a learning resource centre with computers, books and desks to work at. It was here that I attempted to write the blog I published yesterday using the french AZERTY keyboard. This wasn’t overly successful so I ended up, despite initial deep reluctance, buying some roaming data from my phone company. The things I do for this blog…

books in the CDI

One of my favourite parts of the day was when a few of us helped out in an english class. The pupils were preparing their speaking exam texts (something I have just finished for my own oral exam in a few weeks time). The language nerd in me was thrilled with the task and I was soon on with editing an essay about Rihanna with a pupil. I know myself that there is nothing more frustrating than someone correcting your work without any reason as to why you were wrong in the first place; I therefore made it my personal mission to explain every correction I made to her in French… No matter how hard I found it to translate. This however did make me realise how complicated English is as a language, and how little attention I give it on a day-to-day basis. The past tense for example: I ate, I have eaten, I did eat. How do you justify one as correct but not the others? I found myself desperately rummaging in my language knowledge for anything but “It just is” as a way of reasoning. It was fascinating- and after all the mental language analysis explaining in French was the easy part!

After that we went into some classrooms and spoke to some students. They were all very friendly and we got to see the “Iris”. The Iris is the equivalent of the Humanware Braillenote which is a Braille computer that is very popular with VI people in the UK. The Iris also has a LED display so a teacher/parent can read in characters what is displayed in Braille on the refreshable display. It was very interesting and the pupils clearly found it vital to their learning.

After lunch we had a talk about traditional Lyonnaise food and then we went out to an Art Deco 30’s style apartment. It was set out exactly how it would have been in that era and it was fascinating to see all the furniture. The flats were used like council flats, with rent at a subsidised rate. They were very popular with massive waiting lists. I especially loved the giant communal balcony looking onto the busy main road.

the  view from the 30's apartment

The final adventure of the day was a family meal. I was very nervous about this because I was worried about my French not being up to scratch and also being faced with a lot of unfamiliar food. Myself, K and staff member R went to a lovely lady’s house a couple of stops down the line on the metro. She made us a wonderful chicory salad followed by creamy oven baked potatoes. I really surprised myself with my French and found that it was getting easier as the night went on. By the end I was barely thinking before replying to something in French- a big improvement on my usual ‘I have to get it right’ attitude.

R, K and Me at the dinner party

Bonne soirée!

One thought on “The Language Nerd is Unleashed

  1. You would never guess that pillows could be such a divisive issue, but they seem to differ considerably all over Europe. In Germany, for instance, they’re as flat as a pancake and require folding if you like your head even slightly elevated.

    On a different subject, I gather that Lyon is meant to be one of France’s culinary centres, and apparently is well worth a visit. I’ll be interested to see from your blog whether you agree!

    Enjoy the rest of your trip.

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s